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Mercedes-Benz Museum.

The “33 Extras” at the Mercedes-Benz Museum.

The “33 Extras” are a special feature: they bring automobile history and automotive culture to life with examples of often surprising details.

Introduction.

160 vehicles and a total of 1,500 exhibits are showcased in the varied permanent collection at the Mercedes-Benz Museum. The “33 Extras” are a particular highlight: they are distributed throughout the entire museum and can bring the history of personal mobility and motoring culture to life using details that are often surprising.

The “33 Extras” have been divided into three episodes with thematic focuses. The first episode “Cars and technology” has been published. The topics “Vehicle and everyday culture” and “People and mobility” will follow in the near future.

Episode 1/3: Cars and technology.

Discover eleven of the total of “33 Extras” that highlight the topic of cars and technology. Without technology there would be no cars and no personal mobility. In 1886, Carl Benz invented the Patent Motor Car, and Gottlieb Daimler developed the motor carriage. This was the beginning of the history of car innovation. The “33 Extras” in the Mercedes-Benz Museum highlight individual aspects of this process and show clearly how automotive technology, and with it our everyday lives, have changed over the decades.

Mudguards.

Legend 1 – Between the Benz Vis-à-Vis and the Benz Motor Velocipede

The dirt typically found on unmetalled roads gave the mudguard its name. On the one hand, the mudguards protected passengers and cars from road dirt and moisture, and, on the other hand, they were a component that incorporated design and aerodynamics. For many decades now, the once free-standing mudguards have been integrated into the body as wings. 

Hand crank.

Legend 2 – Between Benz 20/35 PS Landaulet and Mercedes 75 PS Doppelphaeton (open tourer)

The hand crank was used to start a combustion engine by hand. Switch on the ignition – turn the crank – the engine starts. It may look easy, but it's physically very hard work. In addition, the motorist had to be prepared for a possible kick-back to avoid arm injuries such as the dreaded “chauffeur’s fracture”. That’s where the electric starter was a blessing. It became established from about 1910 onwards. Today, starting a car is even easier: a simple matter of pushing a button.

Microchip.

Legend 6 – Workbench (room side)

In 1969, Apollo 11 flew to the moon with computers boasting ten megabytes of capacity. Thirty years later, at the turn of the new millennium, a Mercedes-Benz passenger car had control units on board that had no less than 40 megabytes. Today’s vehicles are mobile computers – including data uplinks via radio.

Steering wheel.

Legend 1 – Between Daimler Motorised Business Vehicle and Benz Dos-à-Dos

In 1894, the car was fitted with a steering wheel for the first time. It celebrated its premiere in the first motorsport competition in history – the race from Paris to Rouen. Today’s steering wheels are no longer just the method for steering the vehicle. They are now used to operate numerous systems, such as the on-board computer, voice control, telecommunications and multimedia.

Pedals.

Collection 2 – On the Benz 3-tonne truck

At first, it was not at all clear how the driver was to use his or her feet – every car manufacturer arranged the accelerator, brake and clutch pedals differently. Then, in 1908, the Prussian military decreed a uniform pedal arrangement in army vehicles. This is how the order, which is still in use today, of accelerator, brake and clutch (from right to left) as applied to imperial army trucks came about. However, it took some time for the system to catch on. Even in the 1920s, the number and arrangement of pedals in civilian cars were anything but uniform.

Speedometer.

Legend 3 – Diesel and supercharger

16 km/h was the top speed of the Benz Patent Motor Car of 1886. But cars rapidly became faster and the authorities imposed speed limits for reasons of road safety. This meant that the speedometer became an essential feature of cars in order to be able to monitor one’s own speed. In Mercedes-Benz cars, this is now integrated in the pioneering MBUX multimedia system.

Windscreen wipers.

Collection 1

At the very beginning, people sitting in a car were completely unprotected. The windscreen then put an end to the constant flow of wind directly striking the occupants. However, rain drops on the glass screen inhibited the driver’s view. In 1903, American Mary Anderson invented a “window cleaning device” – the first windscreen wiper. There have been many evolutionary steps since then, but the basic principle has not changed.

Rearview mirror.

Collection 1

The rearview mirror makes it easier to see what is happening behind the car. But this component, too, had to be invented first. That happened at the end of the 19th century thanks to Dorothy Levitt, an Englishwoman who was a car enthusiast. She used a “fairly large hand mirror” as her first rearview mirror.

Seat belt.

Legend 5 – Workbench (room side), to the right of the hot-water rocket

Simply grasp the buckle, pull it over your hips and upper body and fasten it in the lock – putting on the seat belt before setting off has become a matter of course for vehicle drivers and passengers alike. The first of these were lap belts, for example in the 300 SL Roadster (W 198) in the 1950s.

Vehicle tool kit.

Collection 1 – Mercedes-Benz 12/55 PS Pullman saloon

How often is the on-board tool kit still used today? In the past, preparation and maintenance work as well as repairs were part of the motoring experience. Today, the many electronic components make do-it-yourself jobs impossible, and the tyres are often changed by a specialist garage.  

Ignition key.

Legend 6 – Mercedes-Benz 200 D platform

Ignition keys have existed for decades now. Since 1997, Mercedes-Benz has replaced the mechanical ignition lock for the first time in its passenger car model series with an electronic “drive authorisation system”. Today’s ignition keys are mini-computers or smartphones.

Kraftstoffverbrauch kombiniert CO₂-Emissionen kombiniert Stromverbrauch im kombinierten Testzyklus

Product may vary after press date on 04.03.2021.

1 Die angegebenen Werte wurden nach dem vorgeschriebenen Messverfahren ermittelt. Es handelt sich um die „NEFZ-CO₂-Werte“ i. S. v. Art. 2 Nr. 1 Durchführungsverordnung (EU) 2017/1153. Die Kraftstoffverbrauchswerte wurden auf Basis dieser Werte errechnet. Der Stromverbrauch wurde auf der Grundlage der VO 692/2008/EG ermittelt. Weitere Informationen zum offiziellen Kraftstoffverbrauch und den offiziellen spezifischen CO₂-Emissionen neuer Personenkraftwagen können dem „Leitfaden über den Kraftstoffverbrauch, die CO₂-Emissionen und den Stromverbrauch aller neuen Personenkraftwagenmodelle“ entnommen werden, der an allen Verkaufsstellen und bei der Deutschen Automobil Treuhand GmbH unter www.dat.de unentgeltlich erhältlich ist.

4 Angaben zu Kraftstoffverbrauch, Stromverbrauch und CO₂-Emissionen sind vorläufig und wurden vom Technischen Dienst für das Zertifizierungsverfahren nach Maßgabe des WLTP-Prüfverfahrens ermittelt und in NEFZ-Werte korreliert. Eine EG-Typgenehmigung und Konformitätsbescheinigung mit amtlichen Werten liegen noch nicht vor. Abweichungen zwischen den Angaben und den amtlichen Werten sind möglich.

6 Stromverbrauch und Reichweite wurden auf der Grundlage der VO 692/2008/EG ermittelt. Stromverbrauch und Reichweite sind abhängig von der Fahrzeugkonfiguration. Weitere Informationen zum offiziellen Kraftstoffverbrauch und den offiziellen spezifischen CO₂-Emissionen neuer Personenkraftwagen können dem „Leitfaden über den Kraftstoffverbrauch, die CO₂-Emissionen und den Stromverbrauch aller neuen Personenkraftwagenmodelle“ entnommen werden, der an allen Verkaufsstellen und bei der Deutschen Automobil Treuhand GmbH unter www.dat.de unentgeltlich erhältlich ist.